Breaking News

I live in a Twin Cities neighborhood that was a hot spot for unrest. Here's how, hour by hour, my neighbors and I are now working together to support each other.

george floyd brother terrence floyd protests black lives matter st. paul minnesota twin citiesStar Tribune/Getty Images
  • For over a year, Tim Watkins has lived in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood of St. Paul, Minnesota, one of the hot spots of demonstrator and police conflict this past week following the murder of George Floyd by a white police officer in nearby Minneapolis.
  • As unrest grew over the weekend of May 30, Watkins began connecting with neighbors for the first time. Their priority was keeping everyone safe. 
  • The group divided each night into two-hour neighborhood watch-style shifts; they also connected on Facebook to help provide donations, groceries, and other supplies to neighbors in need.
  • Forming this neighborhood bond and creating a collective goal of staying safe helped calm his and his neighbors' sense of fear and isolation, Watkins writes.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
If you have been glued to the news lately, you would be forgiven for thinking that civilization is on the brink of collapse in the Twin Cities. I want you to understand that nothing could be further from the truth.
I live in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood of St. Paul, one of the hotspots of unrest this past week following the heinous murder of George Floyd by a white police officer. I love my neighborhood, with large trees providing a canopy over our streets, a plethora of small businesses and restaurants, and residents from a range of backgrounds.See the rest of the story at Business Insider
NOW WATCH: Tax Day is now July 15 — this is what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
See Also:
  • We're lawyers offering pro-bono services to protesters in Minneapolis. So far, we've received over 200 calls about arrests — here's what it's like on the ground.
  • I'm a doctor in Minneapolis treating coronavirus patients. Until racism is abolished, it will always be a greater threat to justice than this virus.
  • Living through daily racism as a black man in America is a life-threatening condition, according to this public health expert
SEE ALSO: Broken glass, empty shoeboxes, and a single open McDonalds: Photos show a scene of destruction in Santa Monica after looters made their way through businesses
READ MORE: Living through daily racism as a black man in America is a life-threatening condition, according to this public health expert


Source
:http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/BJkOCIwAAiI/george-floyd-protests-how-twin-cities-neighbors-support-each-other-2020-6:

Press Release Distribution

No comments